out

See also: oût and out-

English

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Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle English out, oute, from a combination of Old English ūt (out, preposition & adverb), from Proto-Germanic *ūt (out); and Old English ūte (outside; without, adverb), from Proto-Germanic *ūta (out; outside); both from Proto-Indo-European *úd (upwards, away). Cognate with Scots oot, out (out), Saterland Frisian uut, uute (out), West Frisian út (out), Dutch uit (out), German Low German ut (out), German aus (out), Norwegian/Swedish ut, ute (out; outside), Danish ud, ude (out; outside).

Pronunciation

Adverb

out (not comparable)

See also individual phrasal verbs such as come out, go out, put out, take out, pull out, and so on.
  1. Away from the inside or the centre.
    The magician tapped the hat and pulled out a rabbit.
  2. Away from home or one's usual place.
    Let's eat out tonight
  3. Outside; not indoors.
    Last night we slept out under the stars.
  4. Away from; at a distance.
    Keep out!
  5. Into a state of non-operation; into non-existence.
    Switch the lights out.
    Put the fire out.
  6. To the end; completely.
    I hadn't finished. Hear me out.
  7. Used to intensify or emphasize.
    The place was all decked out for the holidays.
  8. (of the sun, moon, stars, etc.) So as to be visible in the sky, and not covered by clouds, fog, etc.
    The sun came out after the rain, and we saw a rainbow.
  9. (cricket, baseball) Of a player, so as to be disqualified from playing further by some action of a member of the opposing team (such as being stumped in cricket).
    Wilson was bowled out for five runs.

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • (not at home): in

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Preposition

out

  1. (nonstandard, contraction of out of) Away from the inside.
    He threw it out the door.

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • (away from the inside): in

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

out (plural outs)

  1. A means of exit, escape, reprieve, etc.
    They wrote the law to give those organizations an out.
  2. (baseball) A state in which a member of the batting team is removed from play due to the application of various rules of the game such as striking out, hitting a fly ball which is caught by the fielding team before bouncing, etc.
  3. (cricket) A dismissal; a state in which a member of the batting team finishes his turn at bat, due to the application of various rules of the game, such as the bowler knocking over the batsman's wicket with the ball.
  4. (poker) A card which can make a hand a winner.
    • 2006, David Apostolico, Lessons from the Professional Poker Tour (page 21)
      If he did have a bigger ace, I still had at least six outs — the case ace, two nines, and three tens. I could also have more outs if he held anything less than A-K.
  5. (dated) A trip out; an outing.
    • 1852-53, Charles Dickens, Bleak House
      Us London lawyers don't often get an out; and when we do, we like to make the most of it, you know.
  6. (chiefly in the plural) One who, or that which, is out; especially, one who is out of office.
    Antonym: in
    • 1827, Benjamin Chew, A Sketch of the Politics, Relations, and Statistics, of the Western World (page 192)
      This memoir has nothing to do with the question between the ins and the outs; it is intended neither to support nor to assail the administration; it is general in its views upon a general and national subject; []
  7. A place or space outside of something; a nook or corner; an angle projecting outward; an open space.
  8. (printing, dated) A word or words omitted by the compositor in setting up copy; an omission.

Descendants

  • Japanese: アウト (auto)
  • Korean: 아웃 (aut)

Translations

Verb

out (third-person singular simple present outs, present participle outing, simple past and past participle outed)

  1. (transitive) To eject; to expel.
    • (Can we date this quote by Selden and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      a king outed from his country
    • (Can we date this quote by Heylin and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      The French have been outed of their holds.
  2. (transitive, LGBT) To reveal (a person) to be homosexual.
  3. (transitive) To reveal (a person or organization) as having a certain secret, such as a being a secret agent or undercover detective.
  4. (transitive) To reveal (a secret).
    A Brazilian company outed the new mobile phone design.
  5. (intransitive) To come or go out; to get out or away; to become public or apparent.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene ii]:
      Truth will out.
    • 2016 September 28, Tom English, “Celtic 3–3 Manchester City”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[1], BBC Sport:
      In those opening minutes City looked like a team that were not ready for Celtic's intensity. They looked a bit shocked to be involved in a fight. Class will out, though.

Synonyms

Translations

Adjective

out (not comparable)

  1. Not at home; not at one's office or place of employment.
    I'm sorry, Mr Smith is out at the moment.
  2. Released, available for purchase, download or other use.
    Did you hear? Their newest CD is out!
    • 2009, Roger Stahl, Militainment, Inc.: War, Media, and Popular Culture, page 96:
      The game was commercially released on Xbox and PC in 2005 as an installment of the Close Combat series, which had been out since 1996.
  3. (in various games; used especially of a batsman or batter in cricket or baseball) Dismissed from play under the rules of the game.
    He bowls, Johnson pokes at it ... and ... Johnson is out! Caught behind by Ponsonby!
  4. Openly acknowledging that one is queer and/or genderqueer.
    It's no big deal to be out in the entertainment business.
    • 2011, Allan Bérubé, My Desire for History: Essays in Gay, Community, and Labor History:
      I had not come out yet and he was out but wasn't; quite ungay, I would say, and yet gay.
  5. (of flowers) In bloom.
    The garden looks beautiful now that the roses are out.
  6. (of the sun, moon or stars) Visible in the sky; not obscured by clouds.
    The sun is out, and it's a lovely day.
  7. (of lamps, fires etc.) Not shining or burning.
    I called round to the house but all the lights were out and no one was home.
  8. (of ideas, plans, etc.) Discarded; no longer a possibility.
    Right, so that idea's out. Let's move on to the next one.
  9. No longer popular or in fashion.
    Black is out this season. The new black is white.
  10. Without; no longer in possession of; not having more
    Do you have any bread? Sorry, we're out.
  11. (of calculations or measurements) Containing errors or discrepancies; in error by a stated amount.
    Nothing adds up in this report. All these figures are out.
    The measurement was out by three millimetres.
  12. (obsolete) Of a young lady: having entered society and available to be courted.

Usage notes

  • In cricket, the specific cause or rule under which a batsman is out appears after the word “out”, e.g., “out hit the ball twice”.
  • In baseball, the cause is expressed as a verb with adverbial “out”, e.g., “he grounded out”.

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • (disqualified from playing): in, safe
  • (openly acknowledging one's homosexuality): closeted

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Interjection

out

  1. (procedure word, especially military) A radio procedure word meaning that the station is finished with its transmission and does not expect a response.
    Destruction. Two T-72s destroyed. Three foot mobiles down. Out.
  2. Get out; begone; away!

Derived terms

See also Category:English phrasal verbs with particle (out)

terms derived from out (all parts of speech)

Related terms

References

  • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Bounded landmarks", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

Breton

Pronunciation

Verb

out

  1. second-person singular present indicative of bezañ

Bukiyip

Pronunciation

Noun

out

  1. rat

References


Chinese

Alternative forms

Etymology

Borrowed from English out.

Verb

out

  1. (slang) to be outdated

German

Etymology

Borrowed from English out. Doublet of aus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aʊ̯t/, [ʔaʊ̯tʰ]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aʊ̯t

Adjective

out (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) out of fashion

Declension

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Synonyms

Antonyms

Further reading

  • out in Duden online
  • out” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • out” in PONS (pons.com)
    out” in PONS (pons.com)

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French août (August)

Noun

out

  1. August

Mauritian Creole

Etymology

From French août

Noun

out

  1. August

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch ald, from Proto-Germanic *aldaz.

Pronunciation

Adjective

out (comparative ouder, superlative outst)

  1. old
    Antonym: jonc

Inflection

Adjective
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative Indefinite out oude out oude
Definite oude oude
Accusative ouden oude oude oude
Genitive outs ouder outs ouder
Dative ouden ouder ouden ouden

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Dutch: oud
    • Afrikaans: oud
  • Limburgish: aad

Further reading


Spanish

Noun

out m (plural outs)

  1. (baseball) out