her

See also: hér, hèr, hær, her-, and Her

English

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Etymology

From Middle English here, hir, hire, from Old English hiere (her), from Proto-Germanic *hezōi (dative and genitive singular of *hijō). Cognate with North Frisian hör, Saterland Frisian hier, hiere (her), West Frisian har (her), Dutch haar (her), German Low German hör (her), German ihr (her).

Determiner

her

  1. Belonging to her.
    This is her book

Translations

See also

Pronoun

her

  1. The form of she used after a preposition or as the object of a verb; that woman, that ship, etc.
    Give it to her (after preposition)
    He wrote her a letter (indirect object)
    He treated her for a cold (direct object)
    • February 1896, Ground-swells, by Jeannette H. Walworth, published in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine; page 183:
      "Then what became of her?"
      "Her? Which ‘her’? The park is full of ‘hers’."
      "The lady with the green feathers in her hat. A big Gainsborough hat. I am quite sure it was Miss Hartuff."

Translations

Noun

her (plural hers)

  1. (informal) A female person or animal.
    I think this bird is a him, but it may be a her.
    • Hélène Cixous
      [] daring dizzying passages in other, fleeting and passionate dwellings within the hims and hers whom she inhabits []
    • 2004, Charles J. Sullivan, Love and Survival (page 68)
      By this time, she had so many questions, but she only hit him up for one answer about those “hims” and “hers.” She asked, “Do both hims and hers reproduce hummers?”

Synonyms

Anagrams


Aromanian

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin ferrum. Compare Daco-Romanian fier, Spanish hierro.

Noun

her n (plural heari / heare)

  1. iron

Related terms


Cornish

Noun

her


Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse hér.

Adverb

her

  1. here

Related terms


Dutch

Pronunciation

Adverb

her

  1. here

Usage notes

  • Not in common usage, "hier" is rather used. "her" is only used in expressions like the ones below.

Derived terms


Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse hér.

Adverb

her

  1. here

German

Etymology

From Old High German hera. Coognate to her.

Pronunciation

Adverb

her

  1. hither, to this place, to here, to me/us
  2. ago

Synonyms

Derived terms

See also

Further reading

  • her in Duden online

Gothic

Romanization

hēr

  1. Romanization of 𐌷𐌴𐍂

Icelandic

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

Etymology

From Old Norse herr.

Pronunciation

Noun

her m (genitive singular hers, nominative plural herir)

  1. army, military

Declension

Derived terms


Kurdish

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-Iranian *sárwas.

Adverb

her

  1. every, each
  2. anyone
  3. anyway

Limburgish

Etymology

From hieër

Noun

her m


Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hǣr, from Proto-Germanic *hērą.

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

her (plural heres)

  1. (countable) A hair (follicular growth on the skin)
    • (deprecated use of |lang= parameter)
      a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Apocalips 1:14”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      And the heed of hym and his heeris weren whijt, as whijt wolle, and as snow; and the iȝen of hym as flawme of fier.
      And his head and his hairs were white, as white wool, and like snow, and his eyes were like fire's flame.
  2. (uncountable) hair (follicular growths on the skin)
  3. A hairy animal skin; a pelt or a product made of it.
  4. Something similar in appearance to hair (e.g. a botanical hair)
  5. (figurative) A small part; any part (of a person)
Related terms
Descendants
  • English: hair
  • Scots: hair, hayr, hare
References

Etymology 2

From Old English hiera, from Proto-Germanic *hezōi.

Determiner

her

Pronoun

her

References

Etymology 3

Pronoun

her

References

Etymology 4

Determiner

her

References

North Frisian

Pronoun

her

  1. her: third-person singular, feminine, objective
  2. her: third-person singular, feminine, possesive

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse hér.

Pronunciation

Adverb

her

  1. here

Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hér.

Adverb

her

  1. here
    Det er fint å vera her.
    It's nice to be here.
  2. just now, recently
    Eg såg ho her ein dag.
    I saw her just the other day.

Etymology 2

Noun

her m (definite singular heren, indefinite plural herar, definite plural herane)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by hær

References


Old English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *hē₂r, apparently from the stem *hi- ‘this’; the exact formation is unclear. Cognate with Old Saxon hēr, Old High German hiar, Old Norse hér, Gothic 𐌷𐌴𐍂 (her).

Adverb

hēr

  1. here
    Hēr iċ eom!
    Here I am!
Descendants

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *hērą, from Proto-Indo-European *keres- (rough hair, bristle). Cognate with Old Saxon hār, Dutch haar, Old High German hār (German Haar), Old Norse hár (Swedish hår).

Noun

hēr n


Old High German

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *hairaz.

Adjective

hēr

  1. gray-haired, old
  2. noble, venerable
Descendants
  • Middle High German: hēr
    • German: hehr
  • Old High German: hērro (lord, comp.), hēriro, hēro
    • Middle High German: herre
      • Alemannic German: Heer
      • Cimbrian: hear
      • Central Franconian:
        Hunsrik: Herr, hër
      • German: Herr
      • Rhine Franconian:
        Pennsylvania German: Harr
      • Yiddish: הער(her)
    • Old Saxon: hērro
      • Middle Low German: hēre, herre
        • Low German: her, harr
      • Old English: hearra, heorra, herra, hierra
        • Middle English: herre, harre, hærre, harre
          • English: her, here
          • Scots: her, here, heir
      • Old Frisian: hēra, hōra
        • Saterland Frisian: heere
        • West Frisian: hearre
      • Old Norse: herra, herri
        • Danish: herre
        • Faroese: harra, harri
        • Gutnish: herre
        • Icelandic: herra, herri
        • Norwegian Bokmål: herre
        • Norwegian Nynorsk: herre
        • Swedish: herre
        • Finnish: herra
        • Westrobothnian: harr, häärr
    • Old Dutch: hērro, hēro
      • Middle Dutch: hêre
        • Dutch: heer
          • Afrikaans: heer
        • Limburgish: hieër

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *hiz.

Pronoun

hēr

  1. (northern dialects)
Descendants
  • Middle High German: hër, he
    • Central Franconian:
      • Moselle Franconian: ä, en (from the accusative)
        • Eifelisch: hän, hen, en
        • Luxembourgish: hien, en
      • Ripuarian:
        • Kölsch: , ä
    • East Central German:
      • Lusatian-New Marchian:
      • Thuringian:
        • North Thuringian: he,
    • Rhine Franconian:
      • Hessian:
        • Low Hessian: he,
        • South Hessian: he
    • Vilamovian: hār

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from Persian هر(har). Cognate with Latin salvus (safe, whole), Ancient Greek ὅλος (hólos, complete, whole).

Determiner

her

  1. every
  2. each

Volapük

Noun

her (nominative plural hers)

  1. hair

Declension


Welsh

Pronunciation

Noun

her f (plural heriau)

  1. challenge

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
her unchanged unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Zazaki

Etymology 1

Related to Persian هر(har).

Adjective

her

  1. each

Etymology 2

Related to Persian خر(xar).

Noun

her ?

  1. donkey