had

See also: -had and háð

English

Etymology

From Middle English hadde (preterite), yhad (past participle), from Old English hæfde (first and third person singular preterite), ġehæfd (past participle), from Proto-Germanic *habd-, past and past participle stem of *habjaną (to have), equivalent to have +‎ -ed. Cognate with Dutch had, German hatte, Swedish hade, Icelandic hafði.

Pronunciation

Verb

had

  1. simple past tense and past participle of have.
  2. (auxiliary) Used to form the pluperfect tense, expressing a completed action in the past (with a past participle).
    • 2011 April 15, Ben Cooper, The Guardian, London:
      Cooper seems an odd choice, but imagine if they had taken MTV's advice and chosen Robert Pattinson?
  3. (auxiliary, now rare) As past subjunctive: would have.
    • 1499, John Skelton, The Bowge of Courte:
      To holde myne honde, by God, I had grete payne; / For forthwyth there I had him slayne, / But that I drede mordre wolde come oute [].
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 4, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes, [], book II, printed at London: By Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      Julius Cæsar had escaped death, if going to the Senate-house, that day wherein he was murthered by the Conspirators, he had read a memorial which was presented unto him.
    • 1849, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, In Memoriam, 24:
      If all was good and fair we met, / This earth had been the Paradise / It never look’d to human eyes / Since our first Sun arose and set.

Adjective

had

  1. (obsolete) Available.
    • 1485, William Caxton, The Preface to Le Morte d'Arthur:
      Which be not had in our maternal tongue.

Usage notes

Had, like that, is one of a very few words to be correctly used twice in succession in English, e.g. “He had had several operations previously.”

Related terms

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Verb

had

  1. ; had

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *satos, from *sh₁-tó-, past participle of Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (to sow). Cognate with English seed.

Noun

had m (plural hadoù)

  1. (botany) seed

Central Cagayan Agta

Pronoun

had

  1. (interrogative) where

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Pronunciation

Noun

had m

  1. snake

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

Further reading


Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱeh₂d- (hate), *ḱād-.

Pronunciation

Noun

had n (singular definite hadet, not used in plural form)

  1. hate, hatred

Related terms

Verb

had


Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

Template:nl-verb-form

  1. singular past indicative of hebben

Hungarian

Etymology

From Old Hungarian hadu, from Proto-Ugric *kontə, from Proto-Finno-Ugric [Term?] *kunta.[1] Cognate with Finnish kunta.

Pronunciation

Noun

had (plural hadak)

  1. (military) army

Declension

Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative had hadak
accusative hadat hadakat
dative hadnak hadaknak
instrumental haddal hadakkal
causal-final hadért hadakért
translative haddá hadakká
terminative hadig hadakig
essive-formal hadként hadakként
essive-modal
inessive hadban hadakban
superessive hadon hadakon
adessive hadnál hadaknál
illative hadba hadakba
sublative hadra hadakra
allative hadhoz hadakhoz
elative hadból hadakból
delative hadról hadakról
ablative hadtól hadaktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
hadé hadaké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
hadéi hadakéi
Possessive forms of had
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. hadam hadaim
2nd person sing. hadad hadaid
3rd person sing. hada hadai
1st person plural hadunk hadaink
2nd person plural hadatok hadaitok
3rd person plural haduk hadaik

Derived terms

(Compound words):

References

  1. ^ András Róna-Tas & Árpád Berta, West Old Turkic: Turkic Loanwords in Hungarian. Part 2: L-Z, Conclusions, Apparatus (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2011), 1277.

Jersey Dutch

Verb

had

  1. had
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      En kääd'l had twî jongers; []
      A man had two sons. []

Matal

Verb

had

  1. to walk, go
    Kamkam, kahad à Urusalima aw! (Sləray 21:21)[1]
    Don't go to Jerusalem! (Acts 21:12)

References


Novial

Verb

had

  1. past tense of ha

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *haiduz (state, condition, rank, person). Akin to Old Norse heiðr (dignity, honor), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃 (haidus, manner).

Noun

hād m (nominative plural hādas)

  1. person, individual
  2. a character
    • c. 1011, Byrhtferth, Manual
      Þanne se sċop inn ġebringþ ōðre hādas þe wiþ hine wurdlien swelċe hīe him andswarien, þanne biþ sēo ġesetnes "ġemǣne" oþþe "ġemenġed" ġeċīeġed.
      When the poet brings in other characters who talk with him like they're answering him, the composition is called "common" or "mixed."
  3. individuality
  4. rank, status
  5. a person of the Trinity
    • 10th century, Ælfric, "Of the Catholic Faith"
      Nis se Fæder āna Þrīnes, oþþe se Sunu Þrīnes, oþþe se Hāliġa Gāst Þrīnes, ac þās þrī hādas sind ān god on ānre godcundnesse.
      The Trinity is not the Father alone, or the Sun, or the Holy Spirit; these three persons are one god in one godhead.
  6. honor, dignity
  7. office (esp religious)
  8. state, condition; nature, manner
  9. sex, gender
    • 10th century, Ælfric, "On the Nativity of the Holy Virgins"
      Sēo ġelaðung is ġegaderod of ǣġðres hādes mannum, þæt is, werhādes and wīfhādes.
      The church is gathered from people of each gender, that is, the male sex and the female sex.
  10. (grammar) grammatical person
    • 10th century, Ælfric, Excerptiones de Arte Grammatica Anglice
      Þrī hādas sind worda. Se forma hād is þe spricþ be him selfum ānum ("iċ seċġe", oþþe mid ōðrum mannum on maniġfealdum ġetæle, "wē seċġaþ"). Se ōðer hād is þe se forma spricþ tō ("þū sæġst", oþþe maniġfealdlīċe "ġē seċġaþ"). Se þridda hād is be þām þe se forma hād spricþ tō þām ōðrum hāde ("hē sæġþ", oþþe maniġfealdlīċe "hīe seċġaþ").
      Verbs have three persons. The first person talks about himself alone ("I say", or with other people in the plural, "we say"). The second person is whoever the first person talks to ("you say", or in the plural "y'all say"). The third person is whoever the first person talks about to the second person ("he says", or in the plural "they say").
  11. race; kindred, family; tribe, group
  12. choir

Declension

Related terms


Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Pronunciation

Noun

had m (genitive singular hada, nominative plural hady, genitive plural hadov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. snake, serpent

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • had in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from Arabic حَدّ(ḥadd).

Noun

had (definite accusative hadı, plural hadlar)

  1. limit
  2. boundary

Declension

Inflection
Nominative had
Definite accusative hadı
Singular Plural
Nominative had hadlar
Definite accusative hadı hadları
Dative hada hadlara
Locative hadda hadlarda
Ablative haddan hadlardan
Genitive hadın hadların

Upper Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Noun

had m

  1. snake, serpent

Welsh

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *sato-, from Proto-Indo-European *sh₁-tó-, past participle of *seh₁- (to sow). Cognate with English seed.

Pronunciation

Noun

had m (collective, singulative hedyn, plural hadau)

  1. seed, seeds (collectively)
  2. semen, sperm

Related terms