as

Translingual

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Symbol

as

  1. (metrology) Symbol for attosecond, an SI unit of time equal to 10−18 seconds.
  2. (metrology) arcsecond

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English as, als(a), alswa, from Old English eallswā (just so; as), thus representing a reduced form of also. Compare German Low German as, German als, Dutch als.

Pronunciation

  • (stressed) IPA(key): /æz/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æz
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /əz/

Adverb

as (not comparable)

  1. To such an extent or degree; to the same extent or degree.
    You’re not as tall as I am.
    It's not as well made, but it's twice as expensive.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter IV, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly. ¶ Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan. ¶ “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, in A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      She was like a Beardsley Salome, he had said. And indeed she had the narrow eyes and the high cheekbone of that creature, and as nearly the sinuosity as is compatible with human symmetry. His wooing had been brief but incisive.
  2. In the manner or role (specified).
    The kidnappers released him as agreed.
    The parties were seen as agreeing on a range of issues.
    He was never seen as the boss, but rather as a friend.
    • 2013 July-August, Catherine Clabby, “Focus on Everything”, in American Scientist:
      Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. [] A photo processing technique called focus stacking has changed that. Developed as a tool to electronically combine the sharpest bits of multiple digital images, focus stacking is a boon to biologists seeking full focus on a micron scale.
  3. Considered to be, in relation to something else; in the relation (specified).
    • 1865, The Act of Suicide as Distinct from the Crime of Self-Murder: A Sermon
    • 1937, Tobias Matthay, On Colouring as Distinct from Tone-inflection: A Lecture (London: Oxford University Press)
  4. (dated) For example; for instance. (Compare such as.)
    • 1913, "Aboriginal", in Webster's Unabridged Dictionary:
      First; original; indigenous; primitive; native; as, the aboriginal tribes of America.
Translations

Conjunction

as

  1. In the (same) way or manner that; to the (same) degree that.
    Do as I say!
    She's sharp as a tack.
    I'm under a lot of pressure, as you know.
    As you wish, my lord!
    • 2001, Jason Manning, Mountain Honor, Signet Book (→ISBN):
      "But he's good as dead, and I ain't about to waste a bullet."
    1. Used after so or with instance of as to introduce a comparison.
      She's as sharp as a tack.
      She's twice as strong as I was two years ago.
      It's not so complicated as I expected.
    2. Used to introduce a result: with the result that it is.
      • 1868, Proceedings and Debates of the [New York] Constitutional Convention Held in 1867 and 1868 in the City of Albany, page 2853:
        [...] that the Board of Regents had fallen into disrepute; that intelligent men inquired what the board was; he said that it was a quiet body, and kept out of the newspapers — and so quiet as to lead many to suppose tho board had ceased to exist.
      • 2006, Eric Manasse, The Twenty-First Man, iUniverse (→ISBN), page 7:
        It was a talent he had developed; he could actually be so quiet as to be practically invisible. In class, he was rarely called upon to answer any questions. In the crowded hallways, he could slip in and out without offending any of the local bullies ...
      • 2011, Herwig C. H. Hofmann, Gerard C. Rowe, Alexander H. Türk, Administrative Law and Policy of the European Union, Oxford University Press (→ISBN), page 507:
        Under most circumstances, it will be possible to draw a distinction sufficiently clear as to allow an unambiguous allocation to one or other category.
    3. Expressing concession: though.
      • (Can we date this quote by Macaulay and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
        We wish, however, to avail ourselves of the interest, transient as it may be, which this work has excited.
      • 2009, Matthew Friedman, Laurie B. Slone, J Friedman, After the War Zone (→ISBN):
        If this happens, be patient and, difficult as it may be, try not to take these reactions personally.
  2. At the time that; during the time when:
    1. At the same instant or moment that: when.
      As I came in, she fled.
    2. At the same time that, during the same time when: while.
      He sleeps as the rain falls.
    3. Varying through time in the same proportion that.
      As my fear grew, so did my legs become heavy.
      As she grew older, she grew wiser.
  3. Being that, considering that, because, since.
    As it’s too late, I quit.
  4. (dated) Introducing a comparison with a hypothetical state (+ subjunctive, or with the verb elided): as though, as if. [to 19th century]
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      I start as from some dreadful dream.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts 2:
      And sodenly there cam a sounde from heven as it had bene the commynge off a myghty wynde []
    • c. 1616, William Shakespeare, King Henry VI part 2, First Folio 1623, I.1:
      Oft haue I seene the haughty Cardinall, / More like a Souldier then a man o'th' Church, / As stout and proud as he were Lord of all []
    • 1990, Andrew Fetler, “The third count”, in Triquarterly, number Spring:
      I feel securely fixed on the careering chair, and with the momentum gained I steer myself as on skis to the guard and come to a stop with a happy little flourish.
    • 1992, Katherine Weissman, “The Divorce Gang”, in Ploughshares, volume 18, number 4, page 202:
      They think they are romantic, tragic figures, exiled as on Elba. They picture themselves as enlightened barons bringing civilization, opportunity, and kindness to the brown-skinned.
    • 2011 January 30, Kyle Wagner, “E-readers lighten a traveler's load But choosing the right unit means weighing features, cost, ease of use”, in Denver Post, page Travel 1:
      Newspapers and magazines would load their graphics, and you could doodle as on the Sony Reader Daily Edition.
  5. Functioning as a relative conjunction, and sometimes like a relative pronoun: that, which, who. (See usage notes.) [from 14th c.]
    He had the same problem as she did getting the lock open.
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet:
      Now will he sit under a medlar tree,
      And wish his mistress were that kind of fruit,
      As maids call medlars, when they laugh alone.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition II, section 5, member 1, subsection v:
      the temper is to be altered and amended, with such things as fortify and strengthen the heart and brain []
    • 1854 Charles Dickens, Hard Times, Book I, Chapter II:
      ‘Sissy is not a name,’ said Mr. Gradgrind. ‘Don’t call yourself Sissy. Call yourself Cecilia.’
      ‘It’s father as calls me Sissy, sir,’ returned the young girl in a trembling voice, and with another curtsey.
    • 2016, Alan Moore, Jerusalem, Liveright 2016, page 99:
      “If I had, if I could hold me head up with the better folk, perhaps I'd think again, but I don't reckon as that's very likely now.”
  6. (rare, now England, Midland US and Southern US, possibly obsolete) Than.
    • (Can we date this quote by Fuller and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      The king was not more forward to bestow favours on them as they free to deal affronts to others their superiors.
    • 1660, James Howell, Parly of Beasts, page 48:
      Darkness itself is no more opposite to light as their actions were diametricall to their words.
Usage notes
  • Use of as as a relative conjunction meaning "that" dates to late Middle English and was formerly common in standard English, but is now only standard in constructions like "the same issue as she had" or "the identical issue as the appellant raised before"; otherwise, it is informal,[1] found in the dialects of the Midland, Southern, Midwestern and Western US; and of Lancashire, Cheshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Warwickshire, Northamptonshire, Huntingdonshire, East Anglia, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, Berkshire, Bedfordshire, Essex, Somerset, Dorset, Wiltshire, Surrey, and Cornwall; sometimes in Durham, Westmorland, Yorkshire and Somerset; only rarely in Northumberland and Scotland; and only in certain set phrases in Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Devon.[2]
Alternative forms
  • -'s (contracted form)
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Preposition

as

  1. Introducing a basis of comparison, with an object in the objective case.
    You are not as tall as me.
    They're big as houses.
    • 1913, Mrs. [Marie] Belloc Lowndes, chapter I, in The Lodger, London: Methuen, OCLC 7780546; republished in Novels of Mystery: The Lodger; The Story of Ivy; What Really Happened, New York, N.Y.: Longmans, Green and Co., [], [1933], OCLC 2666860, page 0016:
      A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward, staring into the dull, small fire.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, in A Cuckoo in the Nest[2]:
      She was like a Beardsley Salome, he had said. And indeed she had the narrow eyes and the high cheekbone of that creature, and as nearly the sinuosity as is compatible with human symmetry.
  2. In the role of.
    What is your opinion as a parent?
    • 2000, Tom Pendergast, Sara Pendergast, St. James encyclopedia of popular culture, volume 2, page 223:
      Directed by Howard Hawks, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes starred Marilyn Monroe as Lorelei and Jane Russell as Dorothy.
Usage notes
  • The object in older English may appear, and it may be prescribed as appearing, in the nominative case, similar to than, eg. You are not as tall as I.
Translations

References

  • as at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • as in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin as. Doublet of ace.

Pronunciation

Noun

as (plural ases or asses)

  1. (unit of weight) A libra.
  2. Any of several coins of Rome, coined in bronze or later copper; or the equivalent value.
Translations
Further reading

Etymology 3

a +‎ -s.

Pronunciation

Noun

as

  1. plural of a
Usage notes
  • There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols. New Fowler's Modern English Usage, after noting that the usage has changed, states on page 602 that "after letters an apostrophe is obligatory." The 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style states in paragraph 7.16, "To avoid confusion, lowercase letters ... form the plural with an apostrophe and an s". The Oxford Style Manual on page 116 advocates the use of common sense.

Etymology 4

Shortening of as hell or as fuck.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈæz/ (never unstressed)

Contraction

as

  1. (slang) As hell or as fuck; very much; extremely.
    You killed him? That's metal as, girl.

References

  1. ^ as” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  2. ^ Wright, Joseph (1898–1905) The English Dialect Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press

Anagrams


Achumawi

Pronunciation

Noun

as

  1. water

References


Afrikaans

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Dutch as, from Proto-Germanic *askǭ.

Noun

as (plural asse, diminutive assie)

  1. ash
  2. ashes

Etymology 2

From Dutch as, from Proto-Germanic *ahsō.

Noun

as (plural asse, diminutive assie)

  1. axle
  2. axis

Etymology 3

From Dutch als

Conjunction

as

  1. if
  2. when

Preposition

as

  1. like

Aragonese

Etymology

From Latin illās.

Article

as pl

  1. the
    As mesachas de ZaragozaThe girls from Saragossa

Usage notes

The form las, either pronounced as las or as ras, can be found after words ending with -a.


Catalan

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Latin as (basic Roman unit of money).

Noun

as m (plural asos)

  1. (games) An ace. (the side of a die with a single pip)
  2. (card games) An ace. (a card with a single pip, usually of highest rank in a suit)
  3. (figuratively, sports) An ace. (an expert)
  4. (historical, metrology) An as or a libra. (Roman unit of weight)
  5. (historical, numismatics) An as (Roman unit of money).
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse áss, singular of æsir (the Norse gods).

Noun

as m (plural asos)

  1. (mythology) One of the Æsir.

Etymology 3

Contraction

as

  1. (dialectal) Contraction of the preposition a with the salty article es.
Synonyms
  • al (contraction of a and el)

Etymology 4

Noun

as

  1. plural of a

Cimbrian

Etymology

Confer German als, English as.

(deprecated template usage) (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Conjunction

as

  1. (Sette Comuni) if
    As ze alle khödent azò misses zèinan baar.
    If everyone says it it must be true.

References

  • “as” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse áss (pl æsir).

Noun

as c (singular definite asen, plural indefinite aser)

  1. one of the Æsir

Inflection

Noun

as n (singular definite asset, plural indefinite asser)

  1. A-flat (A♭)

Inflection

Verb

as

  1. imperative of ase

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: as
  • Rhymes: -ɑs

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch asche, from Old Dutch *aska, from Proto-Germanic *askǭ.

Cognate with Low German Asch, German Asche, English ash, West Frisian jiske, Danish aske, Swedish aska.

Noun

as f (plural assen, diminutive asje n)

  1. ash
  2. ashes
Alternative forms
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch asse, from Old Dutch *assa, from Proto-Germanic *ahsō.

Noun

as f (plural assen, diminutive asje n)

  1. axis
  2. axle

Etymology 3

Conjunction

as

  1. (The Hague dialect) Alternative spelling of als

Preposition

as

  1. (The Hague dialect) Alternative spelling of als
  2. (The Hague dialect) eive ... as: as ... as

Fala

Etymology

From Old Portuguese as, from Latin illās.

Article

as f pl (singular a, masculine o, masculine plural os)

  1. feminine plural of o
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme I, Chapter 2: Númerus?:
      As lenguas, idiomas, dialectus o falas tenin un-as funciós mui claras desde o principiu dos siglu i si hai contabilizaus en o mundu un-as 8.000 lenguas, ca un-a con sua importancia numérica relativa, a nossa fala é un tesoiru mais entre elas.
      The tongues, languages or regional variants have some very clear functions since the beginning of the centuries and some 8,000 languages have been accounted for in the world, each with its relative numerical importance, our Fala is another treasure among them.

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑs/, [ˈɑs̠]
  • Rhymes: -ɑs
  • Syllabification: as

Noun

as

  1. (music) A-flat

Declension

Inflection of as (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative as asit
genitive asin asien
partitive asia aseja
illative asiin aseihin
singular plural
nominative as asit
accusative nom. as asit
gen. asin
genitive asin asien
partitive asia aseja
inessive asissa aseissa
elative asista aseista
illative asiin aseihin
adessive asilla aseilla
ablative asilta aseilta
allative asille aseille
essive asina aseina
translative asiksi aseiksi
instructive asein
abessive asitta aseitta
comitative aseineen
Possessive forms of as (type risti)
possessor singular plural
1st person asini asimme
2nd person asisi asinne
3rd person asinsa

Compounds

Anagrams


French

Etymology 1

From Latin as.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -as

Noun

as m (plural as)

  1. ace (card of value 1)
  2. ace (expert or pilot)
  3. as (Roman coin)
Descendants
  • German: As, Ass
    • Hungarian: ász
  • Vietnamese: át

See also

Playing cards in French · cartes à jouer (layout · text)
40 Asso di picche.jpg 41 Due di picche.jpg 42 Tre di picche.jpg 43 Quattro di picche.jpg 44 Cinque di picche.jpg 45 Sei di picche.jpg 46 Sette di picche.jpg
as deux trois quatre cinq six sept
47 Otto di picche.jpg 48 Nove di picche.jpg 49 Dieci di picche.jpg 50 J di picche.jpg 51 Q di picche.jpg 52 K di picche.jpg Jolly Nero.jpg
huit neuf dix valet dame roi joker

Etymology 2

From the verb avoir.

Pronunciation

Verb

as

  1. second-person singular present indicative of avoir
    Tu as un chien.
    You have a dog.

Anagrams

Further reading


Friulian

Etymology

From Latin axis.

Noun

as m

  1. axis
  2. board

Galician

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese as, from Latin illās, accusative feminine plural of ille (that).

Article

as f pl (feminine singular a, masculine singular o, masculine plural os)

  1. (definite) the
Usage notes

The definite article o (in all its forms) regularly forms contractions when it follows the prepositions a (to), con (with), de (of, from), and en (in). For example, con as ("with the") contracts to coas, and en as ("in the") contracts to nas.

Derived terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronoun

as

  1. accusative of elas

Icelandic

Pronunciation

Noun

as n

  1. (music) A flat

Irish

Etymology 1

From Old Irish ass, a (out of) (compare Scottish Gaelic à), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eǵʰs (compare Latin ex).

Pronunciation

Preposition

as (plus dative, triggers no mutation)

  1. out of
    Tóg leabhar aníos as an mála.
    Take a book out of the bag.
    Tá Cathal ag déanamh bríste as an éadach.
    Cathal is making trousers out of the cloth.
    Bíonn Máire á dhéanamh as fearg.
    Máire does it out of anger
  2. from (a place)
    Beidh Pádraig ag teacht as Meiriceá amárach.
    Pádraig will be coming from America tomorrow.
    Is as an nGearmáin í.
    She is from Germany.
    Bhí torann as an seomra leapa.
    There was a noise from the bedroom.
    Bhí cor as na toim.
    There was a movement from the bushes.
  3. off
    Tá boladh as an madra sin.
    That dog smells (lit. There is a smell off that dog).
Inflection
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Irish ass.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

as (emphatic as-san)

  1. third-person masculine singular of as (from, off, out of)
    Ní fhuair tú freagra as.
    You didn’t get an answer from him.
Derived terms

Adverb

as

  1. off (in or into a state of non-operation or non-existence: of a machine, light, etc.)
    Cas as an raidió.
    Turn off the radio.
    Chuir mé an solas as.
    I switched the light off.
  2. out (in or into a state of non-operation or non-existence: of a fire, etc.)
    Tá an tine as.
    The fire is out.
Derived terms

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

as m (genitive singular asa, nominative plural asa)

  1. (literary) shoe
Declension

Etymology 4

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

as m (genitive singular asa)

  1. (literary) milk
Declension

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
as n-as has t-as
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading


Latin

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old Latin *ass, probably from Etruscan. Libra and nummus were also loanwords.

Pronunciation

Noun

as m (genitive assis); third declension

  1. An as; a Roman coin originally made of bronze and weighing a pound, but later made of copper and weighing half an ounce.

Usage notes

It is especially significant as being the coin of least value in the Classical age; as such it was often used in poetry as representative of the idea of worthlessness - one example being in Vivamus atque amemus, where Catullus mentions "valuing opinions of old men at a single as". 2 and a half asses equalled a single sesterce.

Declension

  • The genitive plural is normally assium, but assum is found in Varro.

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative as assēs
Genitive assis assium
assum
Dative assī assibus
Accusative assem assēs
assīs
Ablative asse assibus
Vocative as assēs

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Catalan: as
  • Old French: as
    • Middle French: as
      • French: as
        • German: As, Ass
          • Hungarian: ász
        • Vietnamese: át
    • Middle Dutch: aes
      • Dutch: aas
        • Afrikaans: aas
    • Middle English: as
      • English: ace
        • Italian: asso
        • Japanese: エース (ēsu)
        • Korean: 에이스 (eiseu)
        • Russian: эйс (ejs)
        • Swedish: ess
        • (?) Finnish: ässä
  • Polish: as
  • Portuguese: ás, asse
  • Spanish: as

References

  • as in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • as in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • as in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • as in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to write a history: historiam (-as) scribere
    • an historian: rerum auctor (as authority)
    • sole heir; heir to three-quarters of the estate: heres ex asse, ex dodrante
  • as in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • as in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish ocus (and", originally "proximity), from Proto-Celtic *onkus-tus, from *onkus (near).

Conjunction

as

  1. and

References


Movima

Verb

as

  1. to sit

External links


Navajo

Alternative forms

Interjection

as

  1. oh: expressing surprise

Norman

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

as m (plural as)

  1. (Jersey, card games) ace

Etymology 2

Verb

as

  1. (Guernsey) second-person singular present indicative of aver

Old French

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

as m (oblique plural as, nominative singular as, nominative plural as)

  1. a score of one on a die
Descendants
  • Middle French: as
    • French: as
      • German: As, Ass
        • Hungarian: ász
      • Vietnamese: át
  • Middle Dutch: aes
    • Dutch: aas
      • Afrikaans: aas
  • Middle English: as
    • English: ace
      • Italian: asso
      • Japanese: エース (ēsu)
      • Korean: 에이스 (eiseu)
      • Russian: эйс (ejs)
      • Swedish: ess
      • (?) Finnish: ässä

Etymology 2

Contraction

as

  1. Alternative form of als ("to the")

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

as

  1. second-person singular present indicative of avoir

Old Irish

Verb

as (triggers lenition in a direct relative clause and eclipsis in an indirect relative clause)

  1. third-person singular present indicative relative of is

Pronoun

as

  1. third-person singular masculine of a (out of)

Alternative forms


Old Prussian

Pronoun

as (plural mes)

  1. I, the first-person singular pronoun

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ansuz (god, deity).

Noun

ās m (declension unknown)

  1. god
  2. the runic character (/a/ or /aː/)

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

Compare German als, Dutch als, English as.

Conjunction

as

  1. as
    As ich des Poscht schreib...
    As I write this post...
  2. than
  3. but

Pronoun

as

  1. (relative) which
  2. (relative) who
    Leit as nix zu duh hen
    People who have nothing to do

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /as/
  • (file)

Noun

as m anim

  1. (card games) ace

Declension

Noun

as m pers

  1. ace (skilled pilot)

Declension

Further reading

  • as in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From Old Portuguese as, from Latin illās (with an initial l having disappeared; compare Spanish las).

Pronunciation

Article

as

  1. feminine plural of o

Quotations

(deprecated use of |lang= parameter) For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:o.

See also

Portuguese articles (edit)
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine Masculine Feminine
Definite articles
(the)
o a os as
Indefinite articles
(a, an; some)
um uma uns umas

Pronoun

as f pl

  1. (third person personal) them (as a direct object; the corresponding indirect object is lhes; the form used after prepositions is elas).
    Encontrei-as na rua.I met them in the street.

Usage notes

  • As becomes -las after verb forms ending in -r, -s, or -z, the pronouns nos and vos, and the adverb eis; the ending letter causing the change disappears.
    After ver:
    Posso vê-las?May I see them?
    After pôr:
    Quero pô-las ali.I want to put them there.
    After fiz:
    Fi-las ficar contente.I made them become happy.
    After nos:
    Deu-no-las relutantemente.He gave them to us reluctantly.
    After eis:
    Ei-las!Behold them!
  • Becomes -nas after a nasal diphthong: -ão, -am [ɐ̃w̃], -õe [õj̃], -em, -êm [ẽj̃].
    Detêm-nas como prisioneiros.They detain them as prisoners.
  • In Brazil it is being abandoned in favor of the nominative form elas.
    Eu as vi.Eu vi elas. = "I saw them.

Quotations

(deprecated use of |lang= parameter) For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:as.

Synonyms

See also

Portuguese personal pronouns (edit)
Number Person Nominative
(subject)
Accusative
(direct object)
Dative
(indirect object)
Prepositional Prepositional
with com
Non-declining
m f m f m and f m f m f m f
Singular First eu me mim comigo
Second tu te ti contigo você
o senhor a senhora
Third ele ela o
(lo, no)
a
(la, na)
lhe ele ela com ele com ela o mesmo a mesma
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Plural First nós nos nós connosco (Portugal)
conosco (Brazil)
a gente
Second vós vos vós convosco, com vós vocês
os senhores as senhoras
Third eles elas os
(los, nos)
as
(las, nas)
lhes eles elas com eles com elas os mesmos as mesmas
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Indefinite se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)

Noun

as m

  1. plural of a

Saterland Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian as, ase, asa, als, alse, alsa, equivalent to al +‎ so. More at as.

Adverb

as

  1. as

Conjunction

as

  1. as

Scottish Gaelic

Particle

as

  1. Creates the superlative when preceding the comparative form of an adjective or an adverb.
    glic (wise)as glice (wisest)
    mòr (big)as motha (biggest)

Usage notes

Related terms


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

Borrowed from German As, from Latin as (as, copper coin).

Pronunciation

Noun

ȁs m (Cyrillic spelling а̏с)

  1. (card games, sports) ace

Declension

See also

Playing cards in Serbo-Croatian · igraće karte (layout · text)
40 Asso di picche.jpg 41 Due di picche.jpg 42 Tre di picche.jpg 43 Quattro di picche.jpg 44 Cinque di picche.jpg 45 Sei di picche.jpg 46 Sette di picche.jpg
as, kec dvojka, dvica trojka, trica četvorka, četvrtica petica šestica sedmica
47 Otto di picche.jpg 48 Nove di picche.jpg 49 Dieci di picche.jpg 50 J di picche.jpg 51 Q di picche.jpg 52 K di picche.jpg Jolly Nero.jpg
osmica devetka, devetica desetka, desetica dečko, pub, žandar, fant kraljica, dama kralj džoker

Slovene

Pronunciation

Noun

ȃs m anim

  1. (card games) An ace; in a game of cards.
  2. An ace; somebody very proficient at an activity.

Inflection

Masculine anim., hard o-stem
nom. sing. ás
gen. sing. ása
singular dual plural
nominative ás ása ási
accusative ása ása áse
genitive ása ásov ásov
dative ásu ásoma ásom
locative ásu ásih ásih
instrumental ásom ásoma ási

See also

Playing cards in Slovene · igralne karte (layout · text)
40 Asso di picche.jpg 41 Due di picche.jpg 42 Tre di picche.jpg 43 Quattro di picche.jpg 44 Cinque di picche.jpg 45 Sei di picche.jpg 46 Sette di picche.jpg
as, enka dvojka trojka štirka, štirica petka, petica šestka, šestica sedemka, sedmica
47 Otto di picche.jpg 48 Nove di picche.jpg 49 Dieci di picche.jpg 50 J di picche.jpg 51 Q di picche.jpg 52 K di picche.jpg Jolly Nero.jpg
osmica devetka, devetica desetka, desetica fant kraljica, dama kralj joker

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin as.

Pronunciation

Noun

as m (plural ases)

  1. (card games) An ace; in a game of cards.
  2. An ace; somebody very proficient at an activity.
  3. An as (a Roman coin).

Further reading


Swedish

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German âs.

Noun

as n

  1. Carrion, carcass (of an animal killed by a predator).
  2. (slang) Derogatory and offensive term describing or addressing a person whose behaviour is considered as inconsiderate towards others.
    Dra åt helvete ditt jävla as!Go to hell you bloody arse!
Declension
Declension of as 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative as aset as asen
Genitive as asets as asens
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse áss.

Noun

as c

  1. One of the Æsir, a Norse God.
Declension
Declension of as 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative as asen asar asarna
Genitive as asens asars asarnas
Synonyms

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English arse.

Noun

as

  1. buttocks, backside
  2. bottom, base
  3. reason, meaning, motivation
  4. beginning, source

Derived terms


Turkish

Etymology 1

From Ottoman Turkish آص(as), from Proto-Turkic *argun, *āŕ.

Noun

as (definite accusative ası, plural aslar)

  1. ermine
    Synonyms: kakım, ermin
  2. (dialectal) weasel

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French as.

Noun

as (definite accusative ası, plural aslar)

  1. (card games) ace
Coordinate terms
Playing cards in Turkish · iskambil (layout · text)
40 Asso di picche.jpg 41 Due di picche.jpg 42 Tre di picche.jpg 43 Quattro di picche.jpg 44 Cinque di picche.jpg 45 Sei di picche.jpg 46 Sette di picche.jpg
as, birli ikili üçlü dörtlü beşli altılı yedili
47 Otto di picche.jpg 48 Nove di picche.jpg 49 Dieci di picche.jpg 50 J di picche.jpg 51 Q di picche.jpg 52 K di picche.jpg Jolly Nero.jpg
sekizli dokuzlu onlu bacak, oğlan, vale, fanti, joker kız papaz joker

Etymology 3

Verb

as

  1. second-person singular imperative of asmak

Volapük

Preposition

as (ays, äs)

  1. as

Wagi

Noun

as

  1. woman

Further reading

  • J. Spencer, S. van Cott, B. MacKenzie, G. Muñoz, A Sociolinguistic Survey of the Wagi [fad] Language

West Frisian

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

Conjunction

as

  1. if, provided that
  2. as, like (used to form an equating phrase)
    Grut as in hûs.Big as a house.
  3. than
    Grutter as in hûs.Bigger than a house.
Further reading
  • as (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2

From Old Frisian *ax, from Proto-Germanic *ahsō.

Pronunciation

Noun

as c (plural assen, diminutive aske)

  1. axis
  2. axle (of a car)
Further reading
  • as (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Wolof

Article

as

  1. a small (singular diminutive indefinite article)

Usage notes

Precedes the noun.